Hablon Facemasks

Lin-ay Mask-haves

By Binky Pitogo

As the sewing frenzy started using ordinary textiles to produce cloth face masks, I realized that the rural weaving community could be left behind because their handwoven products may not seem relevant in a pandemic. That was when the idea of creating Lin-ay mask-haves from custom woven hablon by women-4-women came about. I have featured their creations in my most recent Provenciana collection and several times in my previous creations for Lin-ay and I want them to continue their work when it is most needed.

Because face masks only need small pieces of cloth sewn together, I encouraged them to add intricacies in hablon for it to stand out no matter how tiny a piece of it is used. I have to admit I was amazed by the outcome – they exceeded my expectation and I needed to give justice to the amazing geometric layout and play of colors that the weaving women laid out before me.

Our synergistic partnership has resulted in more orders and my visits to the weaving community became even more frequent than before. It makes me happy to know that their looms have not been busier than in this time of Covid-19. It is a convergence of work-from-home and keeping safe in the most beautiful way, successfully turning crisis into opportunity.

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“Hablon and Patadyong Face Masks”

by Jeff Ticao

Trying to think of ways of helping the weaving community as well as preserving the tradition, I came up with Hablon and Patadyong face masks. Chic and stylish, these masks are local weaves from a weaving community in Brgy. Salngan, Oton, Iloilo.

I realized that the most powerful thing we can do is to get involved locally, help our local community and become community activists in our own small circle.

These modern masks are quality sewn with washable 3-ply cotton lining; very trendy and fashionable.

I hope that through this project I could help the local community as weaving is one of their sources of income, especially in this time of crisis. It is my advocacy to help the sewers and weavers by providing them some form of livelihood while also conserving the traditional way of weaving.

Let us all support small economies; wear local; stay fashionable and most importantly safe!

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Paul Conté hablon masks

By Paul Conté

Paul Conté hablon masks started as a project with a campaign to make protective, washable masks for Ilonggos using traditional weaves.

Since my studio operations were halted during the lockdown, I initiated the campaign to produce hablon and patadyong masks at home to help the workers maintain their livelihood.

Each mask consists 3 layers of fabric; hablon/patadyong from miagao and oton. Silawsikaw and lilaktob from Kalinga, filter (microfiber) and cotton lining. I was also able to produce masks which I donated to different hospitals in Iloilo.

As a member of Iloilo Fashion Designers Council and one of the young designers of Iloilo, my goal is to continue the campaign of using indigenous textiles in my designs.

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Glamour masks

By Jun G Candelario

The pandemic caused by Covid-19 has hampered the operation of business all over the world.  The event industry is one of the most affected sectors; these include fashion designers leaving them and their staff jobless. However, this unfortunate event has also opened opportunities for me to promote my passion for fashion and the weaving industry. I came up with an idea of making masks made of hablon as a major material and further glamorized it with details such as laces, crystals and pearls. My keen eye for beauty and detail has resulted to positive results with my creations being big hits in the market. Currently, I am sending orders to Hongkong, Singapore, Korea and some parts of USA. The response for my customized face masks is very remarkable. This pandemic has allowed the rest of the world to see the beauty and functionality of hablon while at the same time providing livelihood to the women in the community and giving them relatively higher compensation through fair trade.

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